How to Make Sodium Ascorbate At Home (How to make buffered Vitamin C using Ascorbic acid and Baking soda)

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How to make sodium ascorbate at home with ascorbic acid and baking soda?

You must be wondering why not use straight ascorbic acid and why make sodium ascorbate?

How to make sodium ascorbate (buffered vitamin c)

Sodium Ascorbate and Ascorbic acid are both called Vitamin C, but they are not same. Sodium Ascorbate is a buffered form of ascorbic acid and the ascorbic acid is the isolated part of Vitamin C. Vitamin C refers to the compound of nutrients containing ascorbic acid, that are present in many fruits and vegetables.

Straight pharmaceutical grade ascorbic acid is too acidic (4.2 pH). The body’s pH level is around 7.35-7.45 (slightly alkaline). When ascorbic acid reaches the bloodstream, the body will have to neutralize the pH by taking calcium and other minerals from your bones, teeth and other organs. Sodium ascorbate is a buffered version of Vitamin C and it is close to 6.9 pH, which is still slightly acidic but manageable. 

You can easily buffer ascorbic acid at home with the help of baking soda and turn ascorbic acid into sodium ascorbate. The recipe is below. 

How to make Buffered Vitamin C (How to make Sodium Ascorbate by buffering Ascorbic acid)

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Mix 2 oz distilled water with ascorbic acid. Stir till dissolved.
  2. In another jar, mix 2 oz distilled water with baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). Put on the lid and shake till soda dissolves.
  3. Slowly (very slowly) dribble the soda water into ascorbic acid solution while stirring. The mixture will bubble furiously. Keep dribbling and mixing. Mix until bubbling stops. 
  4. When the bubbling stops, it means ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate have reacted with each other and now you have Sodium Ascorbate! 

how to make buffered vitamin c - how to make sodium ascorbate

 

Source: Cheryl hones “How to make Liposomal Vitamin C”

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organicbiomama

Hi! My name is Feruza. I am from sunny Uzbekistan. Currently, I am a stay at home mom of two beautiful boys and have a wonderful supportive husband. I hold Masters' degree in Multimedia Engineering, but at this moment, I am just a Mom. With all my love to my family, I try to nourish them with wholesome foods always trying and experimenting new recipes. My hobbies are languages, healthy lifestyle, nourishing food, books, sewing, knitting, DIYs, homeschooling, and much more! I felt the need of my own corner where I could collect all of my favorite recipes and information without losing them. And here it is! Enjoy!

19 Comments:

  1. I find this very confusing as surely you are left with a liquid? So when you come to make the liposomal vitamin C how do you know how much to use? You say for the small batch to use 1 tbsp and 1 tsp, but are you talking about the liquid you are left with when making your own? I’d appreciate clarification. Thanks!

    • Hi, Laura! If you are making liposomal vitamin C, then you just use this liquid sodium ascorbate and will not add that last 4 oz of water. So, the recipe for liposomal vit.C would be 1/4 cup (33 g) Lecithin, 10 oz (300 ml) Distilled Water, and this Liquid sodium ascorbate.

      • Hi Organicbiomama, I see you are using ascorbic acid powder in your homemade recipe to make Sodium ascorbate. I actually have LIQUID lipisomal Ascorbic acid. How would I incorporate the liquid instead of powder into the recipe?
        The dosage says 1TBL= 3000mg

        • Hi, Lonna! Never tried that, but I think if the ascorbic acid is already encapsulated, it would be hard to turn it into sodium ascorbate.

  2. Hi!
    Could you possibly express the weight in grams instead of “spoonfuls”?

  3. This seems like a LOT of baking soda taking into account that the pH of baking soda is 14!
    Other recipes mention 2 parts ascorbic acid to 1 part baking soda…
    Have you tested the pH of the resulting mix?

    • Hi there! No, I didn’t test it yet. I’ll look into it. Thank you!

      • I think this is an important point on making Sodium Ascorbate because this could potentially result in a very large intake of unnecessary sodium (and a foul, salty taste). I see this everywhere and I encountered the problem myself when I started, so I found the answer. Simply speaking the ratio is 1:1, but importantly, not by weight. The weight ratio is 2:1, 2 parts Vitamin C to 1 part Baking Soda.

        To make 1 molecule of Sodium Ascorbate you need 1 molecule of Ascorbic Acid and 1 molecule of Sodium Bicarbonate.
        Vitamin C + Baking Soda = Sodium Ascorbate + Water + Carbon Dioxide
        C6H8O6 + NaHCO3 = C6H7NaO6 + H2O + CO2

        Molar Mass / Molecular Weight;
        Ascorbic Acid = 176.12 g/mol
        Sodium Bicarbonate = 84.0066 g/mol
        (That is close enough to 2:1 for measurement’s sake. A scale is ideal, but you can also reliably do this by volume with powdered Vitamin C)
        Sodium Ascorbate = 198.1059 g/mol
        Water = 18.01528 g/mol
        CO2 = 44.0095 g/mol

        THEREFORE, if you take 176.12 grams of Ascorbic Acid and mix it with 84 grams of Sodium Bicarbonate and react it in water (slowly) you’ll end up with 198.1 grams of Sodium Ascorbate (dissolved in water) & 18 (more) grams of Water, as 44 grams of CO2 float off into the air.

        You can use a minimal amount of water then top up as needed for your recipe, but there should be enough water that everything which remains after the fizzing is dissolved. Whether you use a scale or measuring spoons, you can adjust the final product to your liking with small amounts of Ascorbic Acid or Sodium Bicarbonate so it tastes more tart or more neutral.

        Potency/Equivalence
        (198.1:176.12)
        (1000mg of Sodium Ascorbate will equal 889mg of Vitamin C in terms of potency)
        (1124mg Sodium Ascorbate = 1000mg Vitamin C)

        https://en.intl.chemicalaid.com/tools/equationbalancer.php?equation=C6H8O6+%2B+NaHCO3+%3D+C6H7NaO6+%2B+H2O+%2B+CO2

      • I would say that since we are mostly too acidic, the amount of soda is probably fine. As you might know, many people take just the soda and water regularly to bring in alkalinity.

  4. 1TBS + 1 tsp baking soda should neutralize 1/4 cup of Ascorbic acid, not 1 tsp of Ascorbic acid. I’m confused by your amounts.

  5. Hi there,
    I hate the taste of sodium bicarbonate! Is there a more palatable option, (other than tartaric acid; I believe it’s made from grapes which I’m allergic to)?

    With gratitude,
    Klara.

  6. If you make your own sodium Ascorbate as in the instructions, but the Liposome calls for “powder”. Is it ok to just drain off most all the water and put the 1/4 cup of “paste” in the mix?

  7. I have a question about the Lecithin. I’ve never used it before, and I was wondering whether mine is rancid or something. It’s NOW Supplements Sunflower Lecithin. It doesn’t smell fresh. It doesn’t smell like fish food or grain meal, it smells astringent, faintly like an open can of varnish. The color is on the dark brown/grey side. A number of reviews complained of receiving spoiled product, but I don’t have anything to compare it to. I’ve added about 125% what the recipe calls for and it’s still rather thin and watery.

  8. You really need to change your amounts. Who gave those to you?

    The ratio of ascorbic acid to sodium bicarbonate should be 11:4. So 11 parts of AA to 4 parts of SB. Or 1 tbsp of AA to 1 heaping tsp of SB is also good for this recipe.

    It is also advised to mix the powders together and then add a little water. You get a big fizzy reaction, but the benefit is that you get more of the AA and SB to react. It will not all react if you first dissolve it.

    I found the following information on the web:
    The stoichiometric ratio of sodium bicarbonate to ascorbic acid is 0.477, or 477 mg of sodium bicarbonate to 1 g of ascorbic acid. The volume of 0.477 g of sodium bicarbonate is 0.477/2.2 = 0.217 milliliter, and the volume of 1 g of ascorbic acid is 1/1.69 = 0.592 milliliter. The ratio of ascorbic acid to sodium bicarbonate, by volume, is 0.592/0.217 = 2.73, or 2.73 parts ascorbic acid to 1 part sodium bicarbonate, which is about 11 parts ascorbic acid to 4 parts sodium bicarbonate.
    Or: 3 tsp Vit C + 1 heaping tsp SB
    1 tsp is 5ml, therefore 8.5 grams of Vit C.
    1 tbsp = 3 tsp = 15 ml = 25.5 grams

  9. All very confusing, how about what is a food recipe for taking 1000mg of ascorbic acid mixed with what to nuetralize. Thanks

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